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 Advisory Link

Spring 2008 Newsletter

 

 1408 Melody Breeze Ct.

Roanoke, TX 76262

817-379-0956

http://www.advisorylink-dfw.com

news@advisorylink-dfw.com


INDEX

What’s New with Advisory Link?

Women in High Places in Sports

Trend Watch

Quarterly Tip

Article: It’s a Fact - Every Business Needs Women

Check Out Our Website and Blog

Kudos


What’s New with Advisory Link?


The first quarter of 2008 has been busy. One of our many exciting ventures was creating our new blog, which is only a month old - www.advisorylink-dfw.com/MarketingToWomen. We invite you to read it, comment on it and be an interactive partner in our efforts to enhance companies marketing and selling to women, as well as helping them recruit, retain and promote women within their organizations. Getting feedback from numerous people, as well as personal stories and comments, will help make the site interesting for everyone.

Advisory Link also is putting together a fantastic group of women who will be on Advisory Link’s Marketing to Women Panel. Gerry Myers will moderate the discussions. The panel will speak at corporation conferences, associations’ trade shows and other meetings. By having a panel, a company will receive the benefit of multiple minds and specialized expertise within the marketing to women’s genre. For more information, contact us at gerry@advisorylink-dfw.com or 817-379-0956.

Gerry Myers, CEO of Advisory Link, was asked to serve on the online Panel of Experts for www.SalesPractice.com. The site is a resource for people to explore sales training articles, videos, forums, etc. Myers will respond to a variety of sales-related questions people pose to the panel. While on the site, don’t miss her featured article.

In addition, we have formed alliances with other women who focus much of their efforts on marketing to women. These links are available in our resource section of our website and in our blog roll. There are a number of very interesting women blogger sites that provide an abundance of great information.

Lastly, we are working on a chapter for a book that is due out in the fall. We will be focusing on key women in leadership, the journey they took to get to their positions, what marketing strategies they used to enhance their company’s profitability with women, etc. More on that in our next newsletter.

Lastly, Gerry Myers authored an article for Marketingprofs.com titled, How to Expand Your Vision to Include the New 4 Ps of Marketing: Pearls, Pumps, Purses, and Power.


Women in High Places in Sports


In the early twentieth century, professional women athletes were often pioneers in their sports and paved the way for girls and women athletes who followed them. The women featured below have broken records in golf, track and field, tennis, soccer, ice skating, horse racing, swimming and gymnastics. Many of their records still stand today.
 

Babe Didrikson Zaharias 1911-1956

Babe Didrikson Zaharias’ sports career lasted nearly 25 years. In 1932 she won Olympic gold in the javelin and 80-meter hurdles. Although already a recognized athlete in track and field, she took up golf in 1935. Even though she missed the cut, she competed in the Los Angeles Open, a men’s PGA event, a feat not duplicated until nearly six decades later by Suzy Whaley, Annika Sorenstam and Michelle Wie. In 1950 she was one of the founding members of the LPGA. She was honored by being in the Hall of Fame for two different sports careers, excelling in both track and field and golf. The Associated Press named her the “Greatest Female Athlete of the First Half of the 20th Century.”

Wilma Rudolph 1940-1994

Before becoming the world's fastest female, Wilma Rudolph had to learn to walk on her own. As a child, Rudolph (the 17th of 21 children) was afflicted with polio and grew up wearing a brace on her right leg. To everyone’s surprise, at the age of nine, she removed the brace and walked unassisted. Eleven years later at the age of 20, she won the 100 and 200 meters and the 4x100 at the Olympics in Rome. Rudolph was named United Press “Athlete of the Year” and Associated Press “Woman Athlete of the Year,” both in 1960. Her numerous awards include being voted into the National Black Sports Hall of Fame and the Entertainment Hall of Fame in 1973, the National Track and Field Hall of Fame in 1974, the U.S. Olympic Hall of Fame in 1983 and the National Women's Hall of Fame in 1994.

Billie Jean King

Billie Jean King’s impressive tennis career, which lasted more than two decades, includes 39 Grand Slam titles and 695 match victories. She is the only woman to win the U.S. singles title on four surfaces (grass, clay, carpet, hard courts). King became the first female athlete to surpass the $100,000 benchmark in annual prize money. In 1967 she was selected as “Outstanding Female Athlete of the World.” In 1972 she was named Sports Illustrated “Sportsperson of the Year,” the first woman to be so honored; and in 1973, she was dubbed “Female Athlete of the Year.” King was a trailblazer who used her fame on the court to pave the way for the next generation of female athletes. She will always be remembered for her 1973 victory over Bobby Riggs in the “Battle of the Sexes” match. In 1974 she helped create the Women's Sports Foundation and was a vocal supporter of Title IX. She continues to be active in growing the game of tennis, a sport now filled with women millionaires who are international celebrities

Peggy Fleming

Peggy Fleming established a new standard for artistic elegance on the ice. After winning five straight national titles and three straight world championships, as well as being the U.S.'s only gold medal winner in Grenoble, Fleming moved into a life involving many roles: professional skater, broadcaster, wife, mother, breast-cancer survivor and author. She was invited to the White House by four different administrations, and in 1980, became the first skater ever invited to perform there. In 1999 Fleming was honored at the Sports Illustrated 20th Century Awards. She was in an elite group of seven “Athletes Who Changed the Game.” Other award recipients included Arnold Palmer, Billie Jean King and Jackie Robinson. She was further honored by being asked to carry the Olympic flame in the 2002 Opening Ceremonies in Salt Lake City.

Kathy Whitworth

Kathy Whitworth’s impressive 88 career victories carved out her place in history by having more wins than any other American professional golfer, male or female. As a student, Whitworth won the New Mexico State Amateur Open twice. In 1958 she joined the LPGA tour and, after four years on tour, received her first tournament victory. The following year she won eight tournaments. Whitworth, often referred to as the “first lady of golf,” was the LPGA's leading money-winner from 1965 to 1973 and was the first female golfer to earn a million dollars in prize money. During her 33 year career, she was named “LPGA Player of the Year” seven times and won six majors. In 1975 Whitworth was inducted into the LPGA Hall of Fame and later the World Golf Hall of Fame.

Mia Hamm

At 15, Hamm became the youngest person ever to be a member of the U.S. National Soccer Team. She won four NCAA titles at North Carolina, an Olympic gold medal, two World Cup championships and five “U.S. Female Player of the Year” awards. During her brilliant career, she scored 158 goals in international competition, more than any other player in history. She was named the women's “FIFA World Player of the Year” the first two times the award was given (in 2001 and 2002). In 2007, in her first year of eligibility, she was inducted into the National Soccer Hall of Fame and the following year into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame. She is the author of Go For the Goal: A Champion's Guide to Winning in Soccer and Life and has become an inspiration and role model to a generation of girls

Julie Krone

Julie Krone, a renown jockey, shattered the myth that women lack the fortitude, aggressive temperament, mental toughness and physical strength to win at the highest levels of the “sport of kings.” Krone was the first woman to win the riding title at a major track and is one of only four jockeys to win six races in one day. In 1988 she became the first woman to compete in the prestigious Breeders' Cup. Krone's most dramatic victory came in 1993 when she won the Belmont Stakes riding long-shot Colonial Affair. She remains the only female jockey to ever win a Triple Crown race. When she retired from competition at the age of 35, after an 18-year career, Krone had won 3,456 races and earned $81 million in purses.  

Janet Evans

As a 5'5" teenager at the 1988 Seoul Games, Evans won gold medals in the 400-meter individual medley; the 800 freestyle (in which she set an Olympic record); and the 400 free, in which she broke the existing world record by nearly four seconds. The following year, at the Pan Pacific Games in Tokyo, Evans won three individual gold medals and broke her own world mark in the 800 free. She was the first U.S. woman to win four Olympic gold medals in swimming. Evans didn't lose in the 800 or 1,500 at any level of competition for eight years. She won the “Sullivan Award” as the nation's top amateur athlete and was named the “USOC's Sportswoman of the Year.” Her numerous wins include five NCAA, 45 national and 17 international titles.

Mary Lou Retton

At the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics, at the age of 16, Retton successfully performed an impressive full-twisting layout double Tsukahara that she had perfected. No other woman had ever attempted to perform this vault in competition. As a result, she became the first American woman to win Olympic gold in gymnastics. Retton's Olympic performance made her America's Sweetheart. She landed on the cover of Sports Illustrated, on a Wheaties box and on almost any television show she could fit into her schedule. Retton also succeeded in winning silver in both the individual vault and team competition, and a bronze in both the floor exercise and uneven bars, for an unprecedented five medals.


Although we highlighted a variety of women in different sports, the article barely touches the surface of the incredible athletes we could write about. Lyn St. James was the first woman to race full-time in the Indy circuit and Dawn Fraser claimed the title of the greatest freestyle sprinter in history. Lynn Hill was the only person to free-climb the “nose” route of Yosemite’s El Capitan in less than a day. Paula Newby-Fraser was world champion of the Ironman Triathlon eight times. Dawn Riley was the first CEO of an all female team for the America’s Cup sailing event. Maron Rheaume achieved major accomplishments in both her native Canada and in the U.S. as the first woman to play in a professional hockey game. Cammi Granato, the all-time leading scorer in U.S. NHL history, was
only the second woman to broadcast NHL games.

And the list goes on and on... Just this month, twenty-six-year-old Danika Patrick became the first female driver to win an Indy car race.

* Much of the above information was obtain from Sports Illustrated for Women’s Top 100 female athletes


Trend Watch


Marketing to Women Makes Good Cents (and Dollars)

More and more companies are realizing the value and power women have as purchasing agents for themselves, their families and their companies. Whether you are selling to business owners or corporations, chances are good that a woman will be doing the buying. To make sure you are ahead of the competition in this tight economic environment, consider hiring an outside consultant to help avoid costly missteps. Businesses hire consultants for a variety of reasons including to train their sales force in gender issues, to change cultures, to be more effective in recruiting and promoting women and to help them create and manage a successful Women’s Advisory Board (WAB) program. As a result, these businesses are capturing millions of dollars from women consumers, while spending only a very small percentage of their total marketing and advertising budget. Many companies have found that by hiring a consultant who specializes in their needs, it frees up employees to better concentrate on their job demands and provides a phenomenal ROI.


Quarterly Tip





A good guideline to follow is: Treat women customers with the same respect and professionalism that you would want someone to give to your wife, mother and/or daughter.


It’s a Fact - Every Business Needs Women


In today’s competitive business climate and with the economy flirting with a recession, businesses, large and small, need to focus their marketing dollars on selling to the best customers. They also should spend their employment budgets to secure the best talent. In both cases, that is often women.

Women make great salespeople because, as a rule, they listen better, relate well and are more detailed oriented than their male counterpart. They make successful executives because they prefer collaboration to confrontation. When companies fail to utilize the tremendous abilities women have, pay them fairly, promote them or recognize their different styles, women will leave and the company will lose great talent. Below is some “food for thought” in your dealings with women as employees and as consumers.

FACT:

Businesses that want more women employees need to look at their culture, recruitment tactics and internal policies and procedures.

QUESTION:

Is your organization making hiring and promotion of women a top priority and holding appropriate people accountable to reach the company’s goals?

FACT:

To be a great business, companies today need to be diverse. A mix of diverse, talented employees and executives should match your community’s and consumers’ ethnic and demographic profile. To accomplish this, qualified women and minorities must be hired. Women have to believe there is advancement potential for them in the organization.

QUESTION:

So why are there so few women and minorities in the C-suites or upper management?

FACT:

Fortune 500 companies who have women directors (and those who have them in greater numbers) outperform Fortune 500 companies that do not.

QUESTION:

Now that more women are in the pipeline, why aren’t companies taking advantage of this valuable resource and asking more women to serve on their Board of Directors?

FACT:

Effectively targeting women generates higher customer satisfaction—among both men and women.

QUESTION:

So what would the downside be for marketing to women?

FACT:

Allocating your marketing and advertising budget differently to include specific programs aimed at attracting more women customers can enhance your profitability while costing you no more than you have already budgeted.

QUESTION:

Why would you not focus on the person who spends 85% of the money, rather than the one who spends only 15%?

FACT:

Women control trillions of dollars and much of it they have earned.  

QUESTION:

How are you getting your share rather than it going to your competitors?

FACT:

The complex women’s market is varied, not homogeneous. Women are rich, poor, old, young, married, single, divorced, widowed, working, stay-at-home, blue collar, executives, business owners, etc. Recognizing that all women are not the same is an important step. They are not an easily-defined or easily-reached population.

QUESTION:

What are you doing to reach single women, baby boomers, Gen Xs, Gen Ys, grandmothers, ethnic minorities, etc.?

FACT:

Today women earn more than half of all bachelor’s degrees, 57 percent of master’s degrees and 42 percent of doctoral degrees according to the Business and Professional Women’s Foundation. Women consumers are more educated and have more money than ever before.

QUESTION:

How are you taking advantage of this changing demographic?

FACT:

Women spend billions each year on home improvement materials, electronics, financial products, real estate, automotive vehicles, office supplies, clothing, food and healthcare.

QUESTION:

What programs do you have in place to attract these consumers and capture their purchasing power?

FACT:

Many corporations don’t know how to successfully create and implement programs that change their culture, as well as assist them in hiring and selling initiatives with women. Companies continue to make bad decisions, spend money ineffectively, implement programs that don’t produce results and make unsound decisions.

QUESTION:

Is your marketing and recruiting producing significant results with women? If your answer is no, have you considered having Advisory Link create a Women’s Advisory Board to insure success?


Check Out Our Website and Blog


 

 


Our new MarketingToWomen Blog is up and running!
We invite you to read it, comment on it and be an interactive partner in our efforts to enhance companies marketing and selling to women, as well as helping them recruit, retain and promote women within their organizations.



On our website (
www.AdvisoryLink-dfw.com) you will find we have been busy writing articles for www.MarketingProfs.com and Dealer Magazine (also online at www.dealer-magazine.com)


When you visit our website, check out the Marketing to Women or Employing Women brief quizzes on the home page, as well as the Facts about Women section.


KUDOS


Becky Sykes, Executive Director of the Dallas Women’s Foundation, received the Kim Dawson Attitude Award (Attitudes and Attire) for her outstanding contributions to women and girls in the Dallas-Fort Worth area

Cary Broussard, has accepted the position of Vice President of Marketing at Meeting Professionals International

Holly Buchanan and Michele Miller just released their new book, The Soccer Mom Myth

Gaye Pino has been named to the NJBIZ 2008 New Jersey 50 Best Women in Business list

Barbara Lord Watkins chaired the extremely successful 2008 Girls Inc. "She Knows Where She's Going" annual fund raising and awards luncheon held in April

 

Anne Motsenbocker, Dallas Region President, JPMorgan Chase was one of five recipients of the Girls Inc. “She Knows Where She’s Going” award. The other four women are Carmen Garcia, Director of Community Affairs, State Fair of Texas; Dr. Mary Ellen Weber, Vice President for Government Affairs, UTSW Medical Center; Jennifer Bong Nguyen, President, DFW Asian American Citizens Council; and Mary Lois Hudson Sweatt, Owner/Director, Mary Lois School of Dance, Inc.

ING U.S. Financial Services (USFS) and Nissan Motor Co., Ltd. are the recipients of the 2008 Catalyst Award, the annual award that honors exceptional initiatives from companies that support and advance women in business


In each newsletter I want to congratulate a few people for their outstanding achievements or special recognitions they have received. If you have been honored, published or have another item of interest, please let me know so I can share it with others.


Click HERE to download a copy of this newsletter in PDF format.